Storefronts, LA

 
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Storefronts, LA

Design support for small, community-serving businesses

 

With rapid changes taking place across Los Angeles, small businesses in low-moderate income communities of color are vulnerable to displacement. These small businesses are neighborhood assets that provide services to the local community and often function as vessels for cultural, historical, and community knowledge.  

Storefronts, LA is an initiative led by LA-Más and supported by FOUND/LA, a project of the Wurwand Foundation, that strives to support minority business owners (immigrants, women, and/or people of color) across Los Angeles County. LA-Más proudly supports small business development in low-moderate income communities by providing free design, permitting, and construction administration for interior and exterior physical improvements. 

Through low-cost, high-impact design, Storefronts, LA helps mom-and-pop businesses enhance their visibility, highlight their products and services, increase their revenue, and continue to serve their community — all while reflecting neighborhood history and culture.

Partners: We are proud to partner with local business development organizations that are committed to sharing our program information and connecting us with eligible and interested business owners. These organizations include: Inclusive Action for the City; Los Angeles Food Policy Council; Asian Pacific Islander Small Business Program; Opportunity Fund; Managed Career Solutions (MCS), and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Office of Community Business.

Learn More: To learn more, check out our program flyer (English / Spanish) and expanded program booklet (English / Spanish). To apply to participate, fill out our application form (English / Spanish) and get in touch at info@mas.la. To see some of our previous related projects, see below and check out our Small Business Design Support work.

 
 
 
The owners of Santa Luna restaurant in Wilmington – Antonio, Jose, and Teresa – stand in front of their new exterior that was designed to match their vibrant interior. (This project was part of the On Avalon: Small Business Support Program.)

The owners of Santa Luna restaurant in Wilmington – Antonio, Jose, and Teresa – stand in front of their new exterior that was designed to match their vibrant interior. (This project was part of the On Avalon: Small Business Support Program.)

Andy Lee, owner of Sam’s Corner Store, standing behind his new check-out counter, featuring healthy food icons. (This project was a part of the Healthy Neighborhood Market Network, in collaboration with the LA Food Policy Council.)

Andy Lee, owner of Sam’s Corner Store, standing behind his new check-out counter, featuring healthy food icons. (This project was a part of the Healthy Neighborhood Market Network, in collaboration with the LA Food Policy Council.)

 
 
Arlington Heights Market owner Herman Russell stands in his newly redesigned store in Arlington Heights, Los Angeles. (This project was a part of the Healthy Neighborhood Market Network, in collaboration with the LA Food Policy Council.)

Arlington Heights Market owner Herman Russell stands in his newly redesigned store in Arlington Heights, Los Angeles. (This project was a part of the Healthy Neighborhood Market Network, in collaboration with the LA Food Policy Council.)

Maya Mexican Restaurant owners Rudy and Ricardo Sanchez, along with mural artist Nuria Ortiz (Ms. Yellow), in front of their new signage and mural in Wilmington, Los Angeles. (This project was part of the On Avalon: Small Business Support Program.)

Maya Mexican Restaurant owners Rudy and Ricardo Sanchez, along with mural artist Nuria Ortiz (Ms. Yellow), in front of their new signage and mural in Wilmington, Los Angeles. (This project was part of the On Avalon: Small Business Support Program.)